>>Chair Jerry Cook: Good afternoon. I’d like
to call the June 21st meeting of the Board of Trustees for Johnson County Community College
to order. Would you please join me in the Pledge of Allegiance.
>>I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic
for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for
all.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Roll call and recognition
of visitors. Ms. Schlicht.>>Ms. Terri Schlict: We have one visitor
this evening. Roberta Eveslage.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. Awards and
recognitions. Dr. Sopcich.>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Thanks, Chair Cook. I’d
like to turn this over to Dr. Larson. Barbara.>>Dr. Barbara Larson: Yes, thank you, Dr.
Sopcich. We received some great news recently that our Information Services branch placed
fourth in the Digital Community College Survey within the Large Colleges Category Division
for schools with 10,000 students or more, and I want to thank Tom Pagano and all staff
because I know that this was a very onerous application process and I’m very proud of
us and I believe that Tom is going to come and say a few words and accept the award on
our behalf.>>Mr. Tom Pagano: I just wanted to echo Barbara’s
comments and acknowledge the staff here. This is a survey that’s done once a year and basically
this certification — certifying organization looks at all community colleges across the
United States, accredited community colleges and technical schools. So we placed fourth
in the Large School Division, which means that that category is for student — 10,000
students and over. And I will tell you that this survey is intense. It’s about 35-plus
pages with about 105 or more questions, at least 30% of which have extremely — extremely
intense text boxes with about 8-point font. (Laughter.)
And so you have to be creative not just in terms of making sure you’ve checked the right
boxes, but you use a lot of words, and those words, I guess I want to underscore that those
words are not about the technology itself, it’s about how you use the technology, and
that’s really why I think we should be very proud of this award because it’s not about
just buying the gadgets, it’s about how you deploy and use the gadgets. So I want to acknowledge
all the directors that are in I.S., all their managers, particularly Sandra Warner because
she really did actually kind of assign the her to making sure that everybody was doing
their parts and she actually typed a lot of this in. I will say that it was a lot of effort
over multiple weekends and evenings and it was happening during the holiday season. I
was almost reluctant to assign this because I really thought it was going to affect people’s
vacations. But they came through. Of course they know fourth is just not good enough,
so we’re going to hit it again next year if — if we can in any way. So we are very proud
and I want to just thanks to the whole department for their support and so on, and you for acknowledging
it.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Tom, congratulations
to you and the entire team. We really appreciate the great work that the department does. If
you went to the Royals game last night, I think the first 2500 fans received a high
resolution box of some kind. I don’t know the terminology obviously and I don’t know
that it was three-dimensional, but I apologize that your award isn’t in three-dimensional
high resolution that you can put a screen on to see the award, but congratulations.
>>Mr. Tom Pagano: Thank you. (Applause.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Next item is the Open Forum. The Open Forum is an agenda item at
each regularly scheduled board meeting. Speakers must register by completing the registration
form prior to the Open Forum agenda item giving his name or her name, city of residence, name
of the group he or she is representing, the topic, and a brief one- or two-sentence summary
for the presentation. I will abort from the rest of the discussion because we have no
registered speakers tonight, so the Open Forum is hereby closed.
College Lobbyist Report, we do not have a report tonight. I believe that I would say,
though, that each of us are awaiting, as many people in the state are, what the Kansas Supreme
Court’s decision will be with K-12 and I believe that decision is due to come down by June
30, so the clock is ticking on that. But there is no lobbyist report unless anybody has a
question or comment. Committee reports and recommendations. The
first is the audit. The audit minutes are in your packet. We discussed that audit report
at the May meeting. The minutes weren’t available for the board packet, so those minutes are
there for your information. And that moves us to Human Resources. Trustee Cross.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Thank you, Mr. Chair. Human Resources Committee met at 9:30 a.m.
on Monday, June 4th in the Robert Lytle Conference Room. Trustee Lawson and I were there, along
with several members of the cabinet. There were several recommendations that came forth
from that meeting, including benefit renewals and recommendations. Mr. Jerry Zimmerman reviewed
the following recommendations to be presented to the Board of Trustees for approval at the
June board meeting here. With respect to the college’s 403(b) Plan effective July 1, 1978,
the Board of Trustees approved the establishment of the college’s plan and the plan has subsequently
been amended from time to time for administrative and regulatory changes. So on November 1st,
2017, the administration of the plan was changed from a multiple vendor recordkeeping model
to a sole recordkeeping vendor, and as a result, it is necessary to amend and re-state the
plan document to reflect this change throughout. So, therefore, Mr. Chair, it is the Human
Resources Committee’s recommendation that the Board accept the college administration’s
recommendation to approve and adopt the form of the amended JCCC college 403(b) plan effective
January 1st, 2018, and I so move.>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Is there any discussion? Any discussion?
All in favor signify by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Motion carries.>>Trustee Lee Cross: Mr. Chair, the Human
Resources Committee also recommends that the Board of Trustees accept the college administration’s
recommendation to approve and adopt the form of the amended JCCC 457(b) tax deferred retirement
plan effective January 1st, 2018, and I would so move.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and
a second. Any discussion? Any discussion? All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes.)>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: On February 16th, 2017, Mr. Chair, the Board of Trustees also approved
the establishment of an annual contract with Two West Capital Advisors LLC for investment
advisory services for initial term of one year with an option to renew for an additional
four years in one-year increments upon the approval of both parties. And this is up for
renewal with respect to the July 1, 2018, to June 30th, 2019 period, the second year
of the contract and represents no change to the annual fee provisions. The annual fee
for the services covered under this agreement are payable by TIAA from the revenue credit
accounts created by the college 403(b) plan and the college’s tax-deferred retirement
plan. Therefore, Mr. Chair, it is the Human Resources Committee — the recommendation
of the committee that the Board of Trustees accepts the college administration’s recommendation
to authorize the administration to review — to renew the contract for the provision
of investment advisory services with Two West Capital Advisors LLC for the period beginning
July 1, 2018, through June 30th, 2019, at a total expenditure not to exceed $50,000,
and I would so move.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Trustee Musil?
>>Trustee Greg Musil: I apologize for not asking this before the meeting. I don’t know,
Dr. Larson, if this is yours. But who — who would handle it. This is the first time we’ve
had an investment advisor, if I remember right.>>Uh-huh.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Are we developing — have we developed some assessment or evaluation
criteria to see whether — because we act like 50,000 is coming out of just, oh, it’s
just coming out of the stuff, but it’s coming out of somebody’s overall account. So how
do we evaluate whether we’re getting a better deal than when we did it ourselves?
>>Well, we had three — we actually had three recordkeepers prior to that. And so the funds
— the fees that were being assigned to our employees basically by having one we were
able to reduce those fees by more than a half overall. And so pretty much those moneys go
into a pool that pay them. But at some point we’re hoping to get to the point where basically
we’re not paying them at all, basically they’re just making the money on the people that are
using them for investments.>>Trustee Greg Musil: So our employees are
allowed to individually get advice from them on their investment of their —
>>Becky Centlivre: Well, they come in and they talk to all of our employees, the same
as TIAA credit, they come in and talk to them, too. So the employees can pick who they want
to talk to, or they can talk to both of them if they want to. And so that’s the way it’s
set up right now.>>Trustee Greg Musil: Thank you.
>>Dr. Barbara Larson: And also, Becky has an Investment Advisory Committee.
>>Becky Centlivre: Right.>>Dr. Barbara Larson: That includes Jerry
Zimmerman, Rachel Lierz, and others that oversees that process.
>>Becky Centlivre: Right. And we oversee just all of the investments and the choices
that employees have.>>Trustee Greg Musil: Okay. Thank you.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Any other questions? Discussion? All in favor signify by saying
aye. (Ayes.)
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Yes.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Mr. Chair, there’s also a number of policy updates and recommendations
that were made by the administration and cabinet. You can see at Pages 5 and 6. It is therefore,
Mr. Chair, the recommendation of the HR Committee that the Board of Trustees accept the recommendation
of the college administration to approve modifications of the following policies: copyrights, and
patents, equipment, property checkout, loss of personal property, exit interview, and
also to approve the deletion of the employee checkout policy as is shown subsequently in
the board packet, and I need to check with Vice President Larson real quick, did I read
that correctly? We had a change early this afternoon. Is that this one or the next one?
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Is it this one or the next one?
>>Dr. Barbara Larson: I believe it’s this one.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: It’s this one, thank you.
>>You need to add the suspension, demotion, and termination policy was deleted as well.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: And also to approve the deletion of the employee checkout policy
as is shown subsequently in the board packet. I apologize. That’s my fault.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second that.>>So moved.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Mary, did we capture that properly?
>>I think it’s the suspension, demotion and termination policy that was omitted from the
board packet, so we need to –>>Trustee Lee Cross: Very good. Why don’t
I strike what I just said and I re-read what you e-mailed me.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: That would be good. Why don’t you do that for the record.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Therefore, Mr. Chair, it is the recommendation of the HR Committee
that the Board of Trustees accept the recommendation of the college administration to approve modification
to the following policies; copyrights and patents, equipment property checkout, loss
of personal property, exit interview and suspension, demotion and termination, and also to approve
deletion of the employee checkout policy as is shown subsequently in the board packet,
and I would so move. Mary Nero is shaking her head I did it right, so.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion. We have a second. Any discussion or questions?
All in favor signify by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee Lee Cross: Mr. Chair, there are
also a number of other policies, definitions and purposes that are listed in the board
packet. I believe that that concludes my report.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you, Trustee Cross.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Thank you, Mr. Chair.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Learning Quality, Trustee
Snider?>>Trustee Paul Snider: Thank you. The Learning
Quality Committee met June 4th at 4:30. First we received a sabbatical presentation by Janette
Funaro, I believe I’m saying that correctly, foreign language professor. She had a sabbatical
in the fall of 2016 in Oaxaca, Mexico, and was really immersed in the culture and language
and seemed to be beneficial for her. Next we had a presentation by the Office of Grants,
Leadership and Development and they updated the committee on — on how we go about getting
grants, what the process is, and the — and what is on the horizon. One stat that they
gave us was that the college had received $2.3 million in grant revenue in the current
fiscal year, so that’s always — always impressive. We received an update from the Small Business
Development Center providing an overview of the center’s mission and some of their activities
and it’s really an impressive asset that the college has that I think all this, if you
haven’t seen it before through one of these committees, is a great opportunity and something
that I know we’re trying to get out into the community because a lot of community members
don’t know what is available. We were presented Affiliation Agreements with
Shawnee Mission Medical Physicians Group to aid our nursing students and articulation
agreements with Shawnee Mission Blue Valley and Olathe School Districts to support the
Degree in Three program. Details of that are in the packet if you are interested. James
Hopper provided an overview of the Ed Affairs Committee and the purpose, enlightened us
a bit of where they sit in the scheme of everything else, so that was beneficial. Lastly, we were
presented with the upcoming year working agenda for the committee. It is substantially similar
to the current working agenda, and the meeting adjourned at 5:50. I do have a recommendation
to accept the working agenda, so formally the recommendation of Learning Quality Committee
that the Board of Trustees approve the 2018-2019 Learning Quality Committee Working Agenda
as it is shown in the board packet.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Any discussion? Any discussion?
All in favor signify by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee Paul Snider: That would conclude
my report, unless Dr. Musil has anything.>>Trustee Greg Musil: Dr. Musil? That’s an
embarrassment to all the doctors on campus. Professor Funaro’s sabbatical report was excellent
about living in homes and being immersed in the culture with people from all other campuses
and other educators from around the — around the hemisphere really. And I also thought
Dr. Hopper’s report on Ed Affairs was helpful to remember what the role of the Ed Affairs
Committee is, so it was a good meeting.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. Management.
Trustee Lindstrom.>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Thank you, Mr.
Chairman. The Management Committee met at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, June 6th, here in the
board room. The information related to the Management Committee begins on Page 26 and
runs through Page 55 of the board packet. The Management Committee received several
presentations from staff. Barbara Larson, Executive Vice President for Finance and Administrative
Services, presented information on an agreement with the college’s National Academy of Railroad
Sciences, or NARS, with Spoon River College in Canton, Illinois. This agreement can be
found in the Consent Agenda on Page 80 of the board packet. Rachel Lierz, Associate
Vice President, Financial Services, and Chief Financial Officer, reported that the Board
of Trustees approved the college’s 2018-2019 management buddy — budget at its meeting
on May 10th, 2018. The approved budget has been loaded on to the college’s accounting
system in order to facilitate procurement of goods and services for the coming fiscal
year. Mitch Borchers, Associate Vice President of Business Services, presented the Sole Source
Report, as well as the Summary of Awarded Bids between 25,000 and 100,000. That summary
is on Page 30 of the board packet. Rex Hays, Associate Vice President of Campus Services
and Facility Planning, presented the Capital Infrastructure and Inventory and Replacement
Plan. The plan is updated annually and helps guide the allocation of resources for preventative
maintenance and preservation of building infrastructure. He then gave a monthly update on capital projects
and his report is on Pages 48 and 49 of the board packet. He also reviewed the report
on the financial status of Facilities Master Plan projects. That report is in your packet
on Page 50. We also received an overview of progress on the two buildings, the Career
and Tech Ed building and the Fine Arts and Design Studios building, as well as the gym
refurbishment project. As this is the last month of the fiscal year, we have a number
of recommendations, ten to be exact, to present this evening. And our first recommendation,
Ms. Ali Scott, Accounting Planning Coordinator, stated that Kansas statute requires that when
a school district or community college publishes a legal notice in the newspaper, the newspaper
must be one that is published at least weekly, 50 times a year, in the college’s district.
Therefore, it is the recommendation of the Management Committee that the Board of Trustees
accept the recommendation of the college administration to designate the legal record “The Shawnee
Dispatch” and “The Tri-County News” as official newspapers of the college, and that publication
constitutes legal notice on behalf of the Board of Trustees, and I would make that motion.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and
a second. Any discussion? All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes.)>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Ms. Scott also made the second recommendation, and that was
regarding the college’s sponsors selected events that help the college maintain strong
community relationships. The organization —
— to approve the above listed sponsorships for the 2018-2019 fiscal year at a cost of
$17,000, plus an additional $2,000 contingency for a total of $19,000, and I’ll make that
motion.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. It’s always difficult to please
everyone that requests support. I have one question. I see that the Star Spangled Spectacular
continues. Are they still receiving donations even though the Rotary Club no longer participates?
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Trustee Musil brought that to our attention in the meeting,
and the answer — the simple answer to the question is no, but we left that amount in
there in case something else came up. Is that a fair assessment?
>>Trustee Greg Musil: The city is taking the lead on that and we do not know if they’re
going to seek contributions toward that or not. I think that’s why it was left in there
for this transition year.>>Trustee Lee Cross: Who is receiving it,
then?>>Trustee Greg Musil: Well, nobody —
>>Chair Jerry Cook: No one will if there’s no receiving agency, so.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: It’s simply budgeted.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Just budgeted.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: If I may, Mr. Chair?>>Chair Jerry Cook: Sure.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: I just want to comment on there’s some new groups in here, or some
recent groups that we’ve started to give to. In any political or social function I’ve ever
been to in this county or in this state, we’re very well received and appreciated, and I
think this college is known for that and I just wanted to comment that this administration
seems to have done that well also. So thank you.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Well, for everyone that’s happy, there’s probably someone that’s disappointed
because we get a lot of requests. And it’s — we have a motion and a second. All in favor
signify by saying aye. (Ayes).
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Yes.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: The next two recommendations have to do with the college’s board counsel
and financial advisor. These are reappointments of Gilmore & Bell — Gilmore Bell to serve
as bond counsel, and the college — to the college, and Piper Jaffray to serve as the
financial advisor to the college. It should be noted that fees for serving as bond counsel
and financial advisor are payable only upon the closing of financing. Therefore, it is
the recommendation of the Management Committee that the Board of Trustees accept the recommendation
of the college administration to approve the retention of Gilmore Bell as bond counsel
for the fiscal year 2018-2019 and I’ll make that motion.
>>Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a second by Cross.
Thank you, Trustee Musil. Any questions or discussion? All in favor signify by saying
aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee David Lindstrom: As it relates
to the financial advisor, it is the recommendation of the Management Committee that the Board
of Trustees accept the recommendation of the college administration to approve the retention
of Piper Jaffray as financial advisor for the fiscal year 2018-2019, and I’ll make that
motion.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Any discussion? Any discussion?
Trustee Musil?>>Trustee Greg Musil: I just — I’ve raised
this before and I do think it’s important, these two entities are well-known in the community,
have done a very fine job with the college, know the college in and out, but at some period
either an RFQ for that or at least a — a documentation justification of continuation
should be — should be done simply — I mean partly to see if there’s something we’re missing
and partly to keep them on their toes. So I’m not — I don’t say that with any quarrel
with either one of them, I think they’re both fine and I’ve worked with them outside the
college, but I think we ought to at least figure out if there’s a schedule we ought
to use.>>Thank you.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. Any other discussion?
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: I would just echo Trustee Musil’s comments and support that
as well.>>Trustee Lee Cross: I concur.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes.)>>Trustee Lee Cross: Yes.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Moving on, Rachel
Lierz reported to the college administration that the college administration has worked
with the college’s financial advisors on an opportunity to pre-pay the final maturity
of Series 2009 Certificates of Participation or bonds. These bonds were issued to finance
construction of the college’s Olathe Health Education Center, or OHEC. The October 1st,
2018, pre-payment of $1,685,000 maturity date of October 1st, 2019, is estimated to save
the college approximately 15,000 — I’m sorry, $50,000 in net interest savings in the college’s
General Fund. Therefore, it is the recommendation of the Management Committee that the Board
of Trustees accept the recommendation of the college administration to adopt the form of
Resolution authorizing the redemption of the Series 2009 Certificates of Participation
at the pre-payment amount of $1,685,000 and I’ll make that motion.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and
a second. Any discussion? I would just make a comment before we vote that I really appreciate
the staff, Rachel, and others that — and with our bond counsel and with our other financial
advisors to bring these forward because if we’re — if we’re capable of and we know of
that pre-payment $50,000 is — is serious savings. So thank you to the Management Committee
and to the team for bringing that forward. Any discussion? All in favor signify by saying
aye. (Ayes).
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee David Lindstrom: The final five
recommendations that we will present tonight are based on requests for proposals, or RFPs,
and bids. Our next is the recommendation of the Management Committee that the Board of
Trustees accept the recommendation of the college administration to approve the renewal
of the Annual Contract for Network Infrastructure Equipment and Services with CDW Government
LLC, and in an amount not to exceed $1,011,000, and I’ll make that motion.
>>Trustee Paul Snider: Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and
a second. Any discussion? Any discussion? That’s a lot of money. I’ve — I’ve seen the
detailed reports, Tom, that you give a lot on our digital infrastructure work and it’s
impressive. And appreciate the good work we do here. All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes.)>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Next was the renewal of annual contracts for beverages. Therefore,
it is the recommendation of the Management Committee that the Board of Trustees accept
the recommendation of the college administration to approve the renewal of the Annual Contract
for Beverages with Pepsi Beverages Co at an annual expenditure not to exceed $230,000,
and I will make that motion.>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Any discussion? All in favor —
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Trustee Snider would not second it because he’s a Coke — he’s
a Coke — Coca-Cola fan.>>Trustee Paul Snider: Coke paid for part
of my education, and I still prefer it to this day, but I support this.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes).>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: The renewal of the Annual Contract for Leadership Development
Training Program was next and, therefore, it is the recommendation of the Management
Committee that the Board of Trustees accept the recommendation of the college administration
to approve the renewal of the Annual Contract for the Leadership Development Training Program
with Living as a Leader at a total expenditure not to exceed $115,000, and I will make that
motion.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. And as I recall, Trustee Lindstrom,
this is kind of the second year of the program, we had extensive discussion about this a few
months ago, and so I appreciate that we’re moving forward.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: This is a continuation. Karen, did you have anything you want —
>>Karen Martley: No. This will be — will go there this year and actually one month
into the next fiscal year to get the first 52 people through.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Good.>>Karen Martley: And Trustee Ingram is going
through it, so we can — we’re getting feedback from her.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Further questions or discussion? All in favor signify by saying
aye. (Ayes.)
>>Yes.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: And the next bid is for interior LED lighting upgrades, and
therefore, it is the recommendation of the Management Committee that the Board of Trustees
accept the recommendation of the college administration to approve the low bid of 105,900 — I’m sorry,
$105,097.61 from SFSG Electric, plus an additional $10,509 to allow for contingencies for possible
unforeseen costs, for a total expenditure not to exceed $115,606.61 for interior LED
lighting upgrades, and I will make that motion.>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Any discussion? Any discussion?
All in favor signify by saying aye. (Ayes).
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee David Lindstrom: The final recommendation
is an annual contract for PCSC Systems software and hardware support and service. This is
the system that enables the college door access system, and therefore, it is the recommendation
of the Management Committee that the Board of Trustees accept the recommendation of the
college administration to approve the proposal of Honeywell, Inc., for the establishment
of an Annual Contract for PCSC Systems Software and Hardware Support and Service in an amount
not to exceed $163,500, and I’ll make that motion.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and
a second. Any discussion? All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes.)>>Trustee Lee Cross: Yes.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Before I conclude,
I would invite Trustee Musil or Trustee Snider if they have comments or anything to add regarding
the management. Mr. Chairman, that concludes my report.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you, Trustee Lindstrom. In a week when you’ve traveled to the East
Coast to pay final tribute to your mother, and our sympathy is with you —
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Thank you.>>Chair Jerry Cook: — you had a very extensive
report, and thank you for that detail. Appreciate it very much. President’s Recommendation for
Action. Treasurer’s Report. Trustee Cross.>>Trustee Lee Cross: Yes, thank you, Mr.
Chair. I get so engrossed in the reports, that I didn’t take the time to pull up my
— Recommendations for Action. It is the Treasurer’s Report that the board packet contains the
Treasurer’s Report for the month ended April 30th, 2018. Some items of note include Page
1 of the Treasurer’s Report is the General/Post-Secondary Technical Education Fund summary. April was
the tenth month of the college’s 2017-’18 fiscal year. College’s unencumbered cash balance
as of April 30th in all funds was 105.9 million, which is approximately $16 million higher
than at the same time last year. Expenditures in the Primary Operating Funds are within
the approved budgetary limits, and it is the recommendation of the college administration,
Mr. Chair, that the Board of Trustees approve the Treasurer’s Report for the month ended
April 30th, 2018, subject to audit.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Any discussion? All in favor signify
by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.>>Trustee Lee Cross: As always, Mr. Chair,
I’d like to thank Rachel Lierz and the administration for helping preparing these remarks and that
concludes my report.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. Advisory committees.
Dr. Sopcich?>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Thank you, Dr. Cook. Briefly,
I’d like to cover the Advisory Committees and also offer recommendation for them. You
all received Supplement B here, which contains over 50 different Advisory Committees. These
play a very important role on our campus as they advise our programs and tries to maintain
a degree of relevance in what they offer. So it’s a great way to get folks in the community
involved, as well as keeping our programs up-to-speed. The members of these committees
lend their expertise and dedication to help plan our educational experiences for our students
and to assist in college — to the college in articulating its programs with the community.
The committees can also be integral to fundraising and job placement. We’re very fortunate in
Johnson County to have outstanding Advisory Committees.
So it is the recommendation of the college administration that the Board of Trustees
approve the Advisory Committees contained in supplement B from July 1st, 2018, through
June 30th of 2019.>>Trustee Lee Cross: Second. Or so moved.
>>Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Cross moves and Musil
seconds. Or did you get Lindstrom?>>Ms. Terri Schlict: Lindstrom.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Okay. Any discussion? Again, I — I would just echo, Dr. Sopcich,
the tremendous support we get from the community of people willing to serve on these Advisory
Committees and the effort it takes by staff to coordinate and listen and hear and try
and shift the aircraft carrier of each department as it relates to the advisory committee recommendations.
So it is a real blessing to this college and community that we have so many dedicated people
who want to serve. All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes.)>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
Monthly Report to the Board.>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Thank you, Dr. Cook. I
certainly don’t want to be the one to slow the pace of this meeting down, so I will continue
this accelerated rate that we have going. First of all, I have a little bit of potpourri,
a little bit of this and that for you this evening.
You received your report to the board. It’s outstanding. It’s really kind of exciting
when you look at what’s in this thing. Several programs report the number of their graduates,
some of the things they’re doing. It’s a wonderful report and I’d like to thank everyone throughout
the college who has a role in putting that together. I would like to make an announcement
tonight. I’d like to congratulate the Croatian National World Cup soccer team for their 3-0
victory over Argentina. That’s Croatian and I know my dad, who is a religious watcher
of this program, will get a big kick out of it. So thank you very much. I’d also like
to promote the Falsettos. Officer Robles’ son, Jason — Robin, I’m sorry, Robin is featured
in this performance. It’s down at The Arts Asylum, 1000 East 9th Street, Kansas City,
Missouri. It will run through June 24th. So I hope — how is it going, Dan? Pretty good
show so far? Yeah. How is your son doing?>>He’s doing good.
>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Does he have an agent yet?
>>Sorry?>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Does he have an agent?
>>Yeah, he does.>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Excellent. Excellent.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Trustee Musil could do it.
>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: That’s terrific. Thanks, Dan. The summer semester is now in full swing.
I’d like to share some things that are going on around campus. It’s become quite evident
that our faculty, counselors, and staff made a concerted effort toward the summer enrollment
because it shows. Our credit hour enrollment is up .3%. That’s a great job. This semester
and the summer we have 8,417 students taking classes here on our campus, and that’s terrific.
Here are some interesting developments in enrollment when you look versus a year ago.
Our overall enrollment is up 117 credit hours. Our readmissions and new transfers are also
up by 67 students. Our online courses continue to grow, and those are up 860 credit hours
versus a year ago. Our online course delivery now represents 47.7% of our summer credit
hours. We have — and we have fewer high school students and students over the age of 25 enrolled.
And that pretty much is reflective of the national trend. So great job to Enrollment
Services and everyone else, faculty, for putting these wonderful course offerings together.
So while the demand for online courses continues to grow, we know that there are two areas
of study that are predominantly for face-to-face classrooms, fine arts and career and technology.
If you haven’t seen the physical changes on our campus these past weeks, I’m sure you’ll
enjoy watching the time lapse videos of the buildings’ progress for the Career and Technology
Center and the Fine Arts and Design Studios. Both buildings will be completed in early
2019, designed to provide our students and faculty with industry standard equipment,
emerging technology and flexible collaboration space. And look for even more activity as
phase 2 of the Facilities Master Plan kicks into gear on campus during the upcoming months.
Besides the Facilities Master Plan, there are many other improvements and enhancements
on campus. We’re completing six additional active learning classrooms, replacing roofs,
power spraying and repairing our parking garages, replacing carpeting, painting faculty offices,
remodeling rest rooms and more with over 30 summer projects overseen by Campus Services.
It’s my hope that you and our students will share in the excitement of the many transformations
on our campus as we approach the new 2018-19 school year.
You know, during the course of the year, a lot of letters come into the president’s office,
letters and e-mails. I’d like to share one with you that we just got this week. And I’m
just going to read a few passages from this. During those years, and this individual talks
about his interactions with the college, I was well aware of the high quality education
the college offered to the young and older members of our community. This year, however,
I gained even greater insight into the quality of education at Johnson County Community College
as my son attended two semesters there. I want you and all of the trustees to know how
pleased he was with both the courses and the instructors. The instructors took a personal
interest in his progress and frequently complimented him on his performance. This was something
totally new to him, something that had not occurred at, blank, a mammoth impersonal institution,
out of state. Out of state institution. Because of the interest the faculty took in him, he
was encouraged to excel in each course, which as a matter of fact he did. As he now goes
on to a larger state school, all of the encouragement he received at Johnson County undoubtedly
will help him to succeed there also, and the education he received at Johnson County undoubtedly
will remain invaluable as he pursues an undergraduate degree and goes on to graduate school.
While these types of letters come into the president’s office, they’re often — they
often reflect the incredible work that’s done across campus. So I just want to thank you
for making this possible. And that concludes my report.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you, Dr. Sopcich. We’ve just completed the — the members of
the ACCT have just completed the evaluation of our CEO and the board itself, and one of
our key values is advocacy, being an advocate of the community college, moving across the
country. I have said this before and I will say it again and I’ll probably say it every
month. The detail in the president’s report, the addendum you have in your materials is
— is just full of nuggets that we as trustees can use to be advocates of this college in
the community, and I would ask you again to just as we’ve pushed at the national level,
it’s important to be an advocate at Washington for our national issues, but what about every
day at home for your college? And I’ve been trying to push that with little listening
I guess. But in any event, I would say to us at this college, use that president’s report
as — as really good information as you’re visiting in the community. It’s terrific information
and I thank you for that report. I don’t believe we have any old business,
but we do have some new business. Dr. Sopcich.>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Thank you, Dr. Cook. I’m
going to read a statement regarding faculty continuing contracts. This is in regards to
the negotiations. As you are aware, the Board of Trustees and the Faculty Association have
not reached agreement on an updated Master Agreement and negotiations remain open. This
month, our Human Resources and payroll departments are working to transition all current faculty,
counselor, and librarians employed under a 2017-2018 contract for professional employment
into the 2018-2019 academic year. In line with state statutes, these 2017-2018 contracts
for professional employment will continue for the ’18-‘ 19 academic year and the current
2015-2018 Master Agreement will be recognized as continuing for the upcoming academic year.
Terms and conditions of employment that have not naturally expired under these continuing
contracts will remain in full force and effect, and so full-time faculty, counselors, and
librarians will automatically receive the applicable salary step increase, if any, as
outlined in the ’17-’18 instructional salary schedule based on length of contract, years
of experience and education, and this transition does not require a board vote. Recognition
of these continuing contracts will continue until, one, the board and the Faculty Association
approve an updated Master Agreement or, two, the negotiation process as described in the
Kansas statutes, including the Impasse Resolution Process, is fully completed, at which time
the board may enter into a unilateral contract with the Faculty Association. Terms and conditions
that contractually expire under the continuing contracts will not carry over to the ’18-’19
academic year, including the joint standing workload committee, the retirement incentive
program, and early notification program, and the percentage salary increases under the
instructional salary schedules and the overload in summer pay schedules. All of this is informational
only as this process happens automatically. If you have any questions specific to the
continuing contracts at this time, Dr. Larson, Becky Centlivre are prepared to respond. Thank
you.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. Any questions?
Reports from Board Liaisons. Faculty Association. Dr. Harvey? What kind of a lead-in is that?
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: Very serious lead-in. Okay. So I wanted to talk a little bit about
what faculty are doing this summer. They’re doing all sorts of things. In fact, it’s really
hard to get a meeting together if you want to get a few together, because people are
everywhere working on things.>>Trustee Lee Cross: On campus?
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: Yes. And off campus. And all over the world really. We have faculty
teaching courses, of course, and in the summer that can be intense for the students and the
faculty because it goes twice as fast. So you thought that class was hard at normal
speed? Guess what. We’re going twice as fast. So that can be a bit of a grind. There are
also a lot of — I’ve run into faculty who are getting trained right now for Canvas migration
because we’ve just switched over — can you hear me okay?
>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Yeah. I was going to ask you a question.
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: Oh, what.>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: When you say twice as
fast, what do you mean by that?>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: I mean our normal semester
is 16 weeks and summer is 8. So if you meet 4 hours a week usually for class, lecture,
and say 3 hours of lab, which is what one of my typical sections would meet for, then
it would be 8 hours of lecture and 6 hours of lab a week.
>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: One week?>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: Yes. So it’s a lot.
So students typically don’t take too many courses in the summer, so they can really
focus. But it goes quick, yeah. So right now some of the faculty are getting trained on
how to change their courses over the Canvas, how to migrate, how to use Canvas. I got some
questions from others in the hallway today even about the grade book and those sorts
of things because I did switch over last semester because I didn’t want to have to learn this
summer. So I’m already semi — I’m adequate at using Canvas at this point. We’ve got faculty
that are traveling, studying. A lot of people work on their discipline area in the summer.
So it might be writing and reading, going to NEH workshops. I know Dennis Arjo went
to a very intense two-week workshop where he had to read a huge stack of books and it
was on — it was a topic on philosophy and he was the only community college faculty
at this. Everyone else was from a research institution. It was incredibly demanding,
but he came back with all sorts of ideas for his classes. So faculty, the chairs are busy
at work signing waivers and helping students, and I’ve got several requests for reference
letters. So I know everyone else is getting reference letter requests. So there’s a lot
of things going on in the summer. You might think there weren’t — aren’t, but there’s
quite a few things going on. One of the things that I participated in was
a dragon boat race, once again, and we have a Johnson County Community College team made
of some faculty and staff and we are in the community division of the Kansas City Dragon
Boat Festival. And what a dragon boat is, is typically a small boat that has a dragon
head and tail on it. There’s a drum. There’s a drummer that beats on the drum. There are
— there’s a total of 12 people in the boat. So there’s one person in the back that has
an oar to steer the whole thing. And then there are 10 people with — each have one
oar and you’re rowing and you have to row together. So the key to this is not being
the most athletic, having trained the longest, there’s nothing like that I don’t think for
this community level competition. But we are successful, we have won the last three years.
So I’m just going to show you what we win. So we got this plate. And you can find them
in the hallway outside Jim Lane’s office. And we’ve won — we won second place the first
year that I helped participate, and then the last three years we’ve won first place. And
we had a team ask us how do you keep winning? Like what’s your secret? And because we’re
all different ages and it’s not like we have a bunch of 18-year-olds that are, you know,
super buff. We’re all at different ages. And the key is really working together as a team,
that you work with the drum and you have to row together. And we’ll see these teams that
have — they look like they would be really good at this and they are all like rowing
madly, crazy at different paces and they don’t go anywhere. Sometimes they tip over into
Brush Creek. Not good. So we had two goals, one was don’t tip over and the second was
win. So anyway, I wanted to share that. Our team was Sheila Phillip, Jeff Anderson, Jeff
— Sheila always beats the drum. She’s the captain of our team. Jeff is the person who
steers us, and we’re — he’s really good at it. And that’s a pretty important job. We
had Casey Buchanan, Misha Kligman, myself, Valerie Dorsey, Jared Anderson, Mark Cowardin,
Alex Anderson, Darlene Hatcher, Brian Wright. And then we have two folks that are associated
friends that have helped us, but are not employees at the — at the college. Chi-Long Sia and
Garrett Webb. So that’s been our — that was our team this year.
So I do want to talk a little bit about negotiations and about faculty, too. I love working at
Johnson County Community College. I feel very supported by My colleagues here and we have
— I think we have a pretty great team. I was just thinking about this teamwork aspect
of how we won this race, that was our total secret to all of the races we’ve won, and
I think when everybody works together and feels valued and everyone understands the
role and their contribution, I think that things go great. The big item on our list,
of course, is negotiations at the moment. We have strong and continued support from
our faculty for our team and the work that we’ve been doing and that we’re going to continue
doing. There were questions recently about whether or not we would take anything to our
faculty for a vote at this time, and our faculty expect, just wanted to share, our faculty
expect that we will bring a contract to them for a vote when we have completed our negotiations
work. So when our teams have reached an agreement, then we will take a contract to our faculty
for approval. And that is their expectation of us.
We do hope that we can work together to reach an agreement, soon. We’re not that far apart
on the pieces we have left. So I’m hoping we’ll be able to take something to our faculty
before long. I do want to talk a little bit about what it means to serve as a faculty
member at Johnson County Community College. So we looked at by faculty of other institutions
as — as leaders, and part of that is our reputation here at this institution. We are
stewards of some great resources, and I think we all recognize that, and those resources,
one of our best is our people. So we’re building some beautiful buildings, and that’s very
exciting, but they would just be buildings without all the people that do the work of
the college. Our jobs as faculty have evolved in recent years, quite a bit. Some of this
is because of external expectations. You know, we live in an age of accountability, and some
of that’s unavoidable, some of it makes us better at what we do. But it is — it is a
necessary thing. Our faculty have fully embraced each of these changes and they’ve done it
with our usual excellence that we bring to everything we do, and you can see that with
the whole HLC process that so much of what they came to inspect and look at that’s in
those reports was done by people in just countless hours that sometimes gets whittled down to
a little blurb or a little line or a piece of data.
Some of the things that have been added to our list in recent years is program review.
Program review has gone from once every 10 years to once every 5 years to once every
3 years to every year. And programs won’t review themselves. So program review involves
everybody in an area is supposed to be involved, everybody in an area setting goals, evaluating
where they are, where they’re going, what they want to accomplish, and it takes time.
It’s a lot of work. We do come up with some really cool things when we do that, and I
think our programs are better for it. But it is a lot of work. And a lot of that falls
all across campus, but our faculty feel a lot of that extra work. We participate in
general education learning outcomes and at one time that was voluntary. There was a committee
that was paid to collect data and work on that, but now we all do that in every course
that’s a general ed course, and what that looks like at a college this big is coming
up with a project that’s sustainable, that you can get all of your faculty to participate
in, in every section, that’s every section taught by every adjunct, every semester, and
— and then you have to administer your assessment project, collect the data, get together and
reflect on the results of your data, and make decisions about improvements or changes that
you want to make for your course based on that data, and that’s part of the assessment
cycle, and report it with the proper — proper paperwork for the assessment office. So this
is something that we all do now in all of our classes, and I think it does make us better
at our jobs, but it is an additional thing that we didn’t do. We weren’t doing that when
I first started here 10 years ago. All instructors now maintain a faculty portfolio,
and it’s on a five-year cycle, and I did mine last year. It seemed a little — it was a
little reminiscent of when I applied for tenure at my last institution, so it’s a lot of things
that you compile to show that you’ve been doing your job and you’re also supposed to
come up with a project or something you want to do in your classes and put that in your
portfolio. We also, of course, develop classes and serve on AQIP committees, strategic planning
initiatives. And of course our faculty chairs are — we didn’t used to have faculty chairs.
Faculty chairs do a lot of work just to keep things going, and they assist students, they’re
sort of — when a student has a complaint, usually they go first to a faculty chair,
and so they’re solving problems for students all the time. The — I did want to tell you
about one other thing. Am I going too long?>>Go ahead.
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: Okay. So another thing that we do is, when you get — this is just
an example. When you get a report from the grants office, like you did this last month,
you see a lot of grants that the college gets for different things, and we’re very fortunate
to have a grants office here that helps with that. Our faculty, many of those grants come
from faculty initiatives where faculty have an idea and they put together a grant with
the grant office, and then they carry out the work, which can be a huge amount of work.
But they do this because it’s going to address some sort of deficit or need on our campus.
And I just wanted to give you one example of a credible thing that some faculty have
pored into recently on our campus. So last week I was here every day from 8:30
to 5:30 participating in an NSF grant, the first part of it. It is a — let’s see — the
name is Community College Research in Education and Scholarly Teaching Initiative. And it
is for STEM faculty. The PIs, the initiative directors that wrote — that applied for this
grant was Heather Seitz and Jean Ann Vickers. And it is a three-year project and we just
— I’m part of the first cohort because I teach chemistry, so this is for STEM faculty
and I applied. Our first cohort is myself, Doug Patterson, Kevin Cannell, Eve Blobaum,
Jamie Cunningham, and then we also have Brian Hurley from Blue River, part of MCC, Angela
Consani from KCKCC, Elizabeth Kaskow from KCKCC, and Carrie Hale from Butler Community
College. They’re all part of a cohort with us, and the goals of this project, it’s to
train community college faculty in scientific teaching and designing educational research
questions, supporting community college faculty to conduct research in their classrooms, and
to publish and present the research outcomes to a wider audience.
So what that means is basically they want STEM faculty to do educational research in
their classrooms and publish it, and the idea is that especially community colleges, because
we have the most diverse population of students. We have a population unlike four-year institutions,
and right now most of the research in how do students learn chemistry best is done at
four-year institutions, at larger research universities really. And so that’s the whole
point of this, is — and we did this whole workshop where we came up with what’s a problem
of — that your students have in learning your material that you want to address and
then they helped us form our research questions. It was a very individualized workshop. It
was a lot of thinking. And then we researched, you know, what kind of data are we going to
collect on our students when we try to make these changes in our classroom and so we just
kind of went through the whole process and we’re a part of this cohort. We’ll be meeting
monthly for the next two years and there will be another group next summer. And so anyway,
I wanted to share that because the faculty are doing — it’s — you know, you might think
we’re just teaching. But we’re developing things for our students. We are making videos
for our online classes. We’re doing so much more, and I just wanted to communicate that
and share some that, because I think it’s hard when you’re not hanging out with us every
day all day because you’re doing your own jobs, I think it’s hard to realize what people
do. And I’m not an anomaly. I’m just representative of the faculty at this institution.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Dr. Harvey, I have three reactions. Number one is I really appreciate
your detail from your perspective as to the activities the faculty is involved with and
engaged with. And so I believe this is a great platform for you to promote and market the
good work that the faculty does on these committees and these issues.
Secondly, you referenced the grant work, and that’s part of our Consent Agenda, but as
I look through that grant list and the number of people that are engaged and engulfed with
our grant team, it’s pretty impressive. And sometimes we approve these things in Consent
Agenda and/or by project and it could be 500,000, 700,000, there’s a lot of money involved in
these grants that, as you’ve described, people put a lot of effort in to. And I appreciate
that. And my third — my third reaction is that I don’t believe any trustee on this board
at least as I visit with them take lightly the work the faculty does every day to — to
honor their students with their best performance. The letter from Mr. Lerner tonight is one
indicative of that illustration. You mention your lab work. You mentioned your coursework.
I for one hear stories time after time of parents who say my daughter, my son excelled
at Johnson County Community College because of the personal attention they got. So don’t
— don’t ever think that we don’t appreciate or take lightly that behind the scenes and
all of that work that takes place. Did you have a comment, Dr. Sopcich? Trustee Lindstrom.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Thank you. I also feel the same way that Jerry just expressed
regarding faculty. But I have a question. How come there are no photographs or video
of the dragon races?>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: Well, we have video
and photographs. Actually, Jim Lane came and he took some video of us. But we can share
that with you. I didn’t have it in time for tonight to — to have it projected. But we
can definitely share that.>>Trustee David Lindstrom: I appreciate it
and I appreciate the outstanding representation of Johnson County Community College in the
victory circle there, too.>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: Yeah. We’re pretty
excited about it.>>Chair Jerry Cook: I’m sorry, Trustee Musil?
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Well, I’ll just say that for two years I didn’t understand Dennis
because he was a philosophy professor and for the next two years I won’t understand
you because you’re a chemistry professor. We gotta get somebody that’s more on my level.
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: What would — what fields? What field do I need to recruit from?
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Yeah, some — just a general political scientist.
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: There was no political science in that presentation, you’re right.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: Thank you, Melanie.>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Dr. Harvey, that was terrific.
Thank you. Perhaps we could get our negotiating teams in a dragon boat and put them on Brush
Creek and see what — where we could go with that.
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: You know, it would be one of those you better work together because,
okay, I’m not even making this up, there was a dead possum in Brush Creek and so we were
like we cannot fall in. (Laughter.)
We fall in, I’m going home. (Laughter.)
That was kind of the consensus.>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Thank you.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you very much. Appreciate it.
>>Dr. Melanie Harvey: That was more than you wanted to know. Wasn’t it?
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Johnson County Research Triangle. Trustee Lindstrom.
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Was the possum dead before or after?
>>Yeah. (Laughter.)
>>Trustee David Lindstrom: The J-CERT report will not be as lengthy as the Management Report.
We have the J-CERT Authority has not met since our last meeting on Monday, May 7th, where
we met at KU Edwards Campus in Overland Park. At that — at our May trustee meeting, I provided
that report from that meeting. Really the only thing I have tonight is two months reporting
on sales tax of Johnson County. April sales tax toward the J-CERT authority is $1,311,177.35,
which was actually down 3.84%. However, in May, it rebounded and was at just over 1.5
million, or up 5%, and for the year we’re up 2% in sales tax here in Johnson County.
For more information on the Johnson County Triangle, I would recommend everyone go to
jocotriangle.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. The next meeting of the Johnson
County Education Research Triangle is Monday, November 7th, 2018, at 7:30 a.m. The public
is invited at K-State Olathe Campus, which is out in Olathe. Mr. Chairman, that concludes
my report.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Any questions of Trustee
Lindstrom? Thank you. The next item is the Kansas Association of
Community College Trustees. KACCT met June 1st and 2nd at Kansas City Kansas Community
College. Trustees Musil and Ingram — Trustee Ingram and I were at that meeting, along with
Dr. Weber. The agenda was to have Noah Brown present, but he had a family emergency and
could not attend, but Brian Davidson took the whole block of time on Friday and talked
about transparent leadership. He’s the founder and president of Intrinsic Institute, Intrinsic
Leadership and Igniting the Greatness Within, and so we spent an afternoon with him.
We had a legislative update from our lobbyist, Allie Devine. Then that evening — and then
at the end of the afternoon we had the graduation or the reports I should say from our Leadership
Institute. You’ll recall that KACCT implemented a Kansas Leadership Institute trying to develop
administrators within our own ranks as we dealt with presidential vacancies and vice
presidential vacancies, and Karen, we had two folks. Would you like to speak to that
a little bit?>>Karen Martley: Yes. This past year Susan
Rider completed the program and Leslie Quinn completed the program from Student Services
and Engagement, and Susan from our Finance Department.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Dr. Weber, you heard some of the remarks. I guess I’m always impressed
with these folks that have come through, and I think now this is the third year we’ve done
this, second or third year. And the sincerity that the people have of this program compared
to probably a university program they had in education — or in leadership development
has been pretty impressive, and they develop quite a strong cohort. Any comments? You heard
the presentation.>>Dr. Randy Weber: Yeah. I would just say
one of the neat things about the group is, one, it’s easy for us to support because our
folks get to see what’s going on at community colleges across the rest of the state. But
also, each of the participants is required to do a project related to their work that
would be an area of consideration for other colleges within the state, and so there’s
a lot of take-away, too. It’s not just kind of collegiality, traveling the state and hanging
out together. There’s a lot of good feedback that come from the work they do, and so it’s
two-fold that way.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you both. Yes.
>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Whenever we talk about this every year, I just want to make it clear
that this leadership program reflects the hard work of Dr. Cook when he was chair of
the KACCT, he made it happen. And so I think it’s outstanding. It emulates a lot of what’s
going on throughout the country in other states. And so, Jerry, that was you, and I think everyone
who takes that is very appreciative of it.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Well, there were a lot
of people involved, but thank you very much. Saturday morning we had a presentation George
Knox, who is President Emeritus from Labette Community College, is on the Higher Learning
Commission team and he gave an update on accreditation for community colleges, a number of colleges
have been going through that. Of course we’re one of them. And then the adjutant general
of the National Guard made a presentation on National Guard scholarships. Dr. Weber
and I visited about that, and there are a number of National Guardsmen in the state
of Kansas who interestingly just need a pathway to get to college, and the National Guard
has a tremendous amount of money available for scholarship funds, and our team is well
aware of that. So that was very, very interesting. Blake Flanders of the Kansas Board of Regents
gave an update on perspectives from the Regents. Major discussion of course was the concurrent
enrollment issue. That legislation failed and I think in part because the colleges can’t
come to an agreement as to what the cost should be for — for tuition fees, so, and reimbursement
from the state. So that will continue, I believe, but Blake was very — very promotional about
certain job needs. He talked about the need for nurses in Kansas, and we just frankly
have to get more students in the nursing program as far as community colleges go. And just
really did a nice job talking about the importance of community colleges.
We had election of officers, and I’m pleased to report that Nancy Ingram was elected secretary
of KACCT, and going forward she will be the representative from Johnson County Community
College as our official vote — voter in representing the college. So we’re pleased about that.
Trustee Musil, Dr. Weber, any comments you have about KACCT?
>>Trustee Greg Musil: I would just say, and I don’t attend a lot of these unless they’re
relatively close, and I think you get an appreciation for people who as they left on Saturday with
their box lunch they were looking at a six and a half hour drive back to Seward County
or to Dodge or to Garden, and for all the differences, we talk a lot about our peer
institutions and they’re really not the other community colleges in Kansas, but a lot of
the issues are the same, recruiting and retaining students, recruiting and retaining faculty,
pressures from taxpayers about what their mill levy ought to be, demand for new programs
and online learning and alternative delivery and all those things, so I think it’s very
helpful to hear that, at least every year or two, from people that are in the same position
we are. You’ll hear people that have been on the board for 35 years or something. So
some of these other communities, it’s pretty amazing how long people commit to their community
college. And I’m glad, one of the things we talked about that I think will be followed
up on by the executive committee is the level of reserves of the organization because there’s
no policy as to what level reserves there ought to be, and in my opinion they’re overly
generous right now given that every community college is feeling some pressure that we could
cut back on those on our contributions for a couple years and still have a plenty healthy
reserve for any contingency. So I’m glad Nancy is secretary. She’ll do
great job representing us, as Jerry will continue to do.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. Dr. Weber, anything?
>>Dr. Randy Weber: I would just add that the president’s meeting there was discussion
around the state funding formula, how much of community colleges percentages received
for the total higher ed budget. Obviously a lot of conversation around the concurrent
and enrollment and then to echo Trustee Musil’s comment that the communities questions or
concerns about mill levy impact, and I think we’re positioned pretty well in that. There
are — there are schools where a significant part of their enrollment comes from outside
of their taxing district, and a significant part of their General Fund does. We’ve reflected
to this group and others before that we receive just north of 60% of our General Fund from
local, but over 75% of our students come directly from Johnson County. And so we’re — a lion’s
share of what we support goes directly to Johnson County residents.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. Thank you for your comments.
Next item is the Foundation report. Trustee Snider.
>>Trustee Paul Snider: Thank you. The Foundation annual luncheon was held on May 22nd in the
CoLab. I believe all the trustees or a vast majority of the trustees and senior staff
attended that long lunch with about 100 other community members that are engaged in our
community college. Foundation President Mary Birch updated everyone on Some Enchanted Evening.
I think we’ve reported here before but David and Mary Zamierowski are going to be the Johnson
Countians of the Year, and Jon and Christi Stewart are chairing that gala. To date, nearly
400,000 in scholarships has been raised. So Mary is very optimistic that we’re going to
break all sorts of records this year, which is great. On June 19th, the executive committee
of the Foundation met also on campus, the primary goal of that meeting was to set and
approve the operating budget for the forthcoming year and to line out a bunch of meeting dates,
which we will get to everyone soon. And then as the fiscal year comes to an end,
the Foundation wanted to thank Dr. Weber and his team and financial aid with their help
in ensuring all of the available scholarships got to students. That’s much appreciated.
And then also, I would like to thank Kate and the Foundation staff for making everything
run so smoothly always. Thank you.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Thank you. The next item
on the agenda is the Consent Agenda. It’s a time when we approve a number of routine
issues with one vote. You have looked at those. Is there any item that any trustee would like
to have removed from the Consent Agenda?>>Trustee Lee Cross: I have some questions
about some of the grants, if I may.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Okay. We’ll pull the
grant contract award out of the Consent Agenda. Any other items? I would entertain a motion
to approve the Consent Agenda item absent Item A-3.
>>Move to approve.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. My discussion? All in favor signify
by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries. Grants, Contracts and Awards. Trustee Cross.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Yes, thank you.>>Trustee Greg Musil: What page is that on?
I’m sorry.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Page 73 to 78.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Thank you, Mr. Chair. I just had a couple of quick questions about,
I’m glad it came up in Dr. Harvey’s report, but with respect to the Dollar General grants
and a number of the other grants, who actually applies for those? That was a question I had.
And I’ve had many times, but I wanted to ask tonight. Like let’s focus on the Dollar General
grants. Who applies for those?>>Dr. Joe Sopcich: Malinda, if you could
take the podium and respond to Trustee Cross.>>Trustee Lee Cross: I don’t want to wander
into the weeds, but I’m glad we get them. I just was dead curious how that happens.
>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: The Dollar General grants go through Continuing Ed, specifically
Adult Education, Janice Blansit, and they’re reoccurring. They get them pretty much every
year. It’s not a — it’s not for sure, but they’ve gotten them consistently each year.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: I mean there really are some serious and impressive grants there.
And so… what percentage of them might come from faculty versus — I — we — when I was
chair of the Learning Quality Committee, we spent some time on this, or maybe it was the
Management. What percentage of the grants that we do apply for would come from faculty?
>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: I can’t give you a number right off the top of my head, but
like, for example, on the National Science Foundation, the one that Dr. Harvey spoke
about, the leads are always going to be faculty in those instances. Things like the Department
of Labor, that’s one of our large grants, that’s led by faculty.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Department of Defense?>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: Uh-huh. Department
— PTAC is actually staff. That’s through continuing education.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Okay.>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: So generally it’s
going to be led by a faculty member unless it’s going through continuing ed, and then
that’s — that’s normally staff.>>Trustee Lee Cross: So when a faculty member
does lead it, how does it occur logistically? And I’m not trying to be difficult. I’m just
trying to understand the logistics of it. The faculty member has the idea and then lays
it at your feet?>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: Well, it can happen
one of two ways. Sometimes we see the opportunity and go to a faculty member or a chair or the
dean and ask what the interest might be, and it starts that way. Or the faculty member
comes to us with an idea that’s been presented to them and wants to determine the feasibility
of it.>>Trustee Lee Cross: The faculty contribution
is not inconsequential?>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: Well, you mean
how are they compensated?>>Trustee Lee Cross: No, no. It’s fairly
consequential, it’s substantial, their contribution in this field, right?
>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: In the grants area? Yeah. It is. Well, it depends on the
grant. If it’s — like if it’s on the continuing ed side it’s normally run by staff. But if
it’s like NSF, Department of Labor, things like that, it can be — it’s the faculty member
leading it. So, yes, they are the principal investigator many times.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: I was in California last week with my brother, who just graduated
— graduate — an alum of this school, so I’m not sure he got his associate’s, but he
said he didn’t want to serve on an aircraft carrier. He’s in the Navy. He just graduated
from the Navy, Naval post-graduate school in Monterey, California. And I asked him why
didn’t you ever want to be on an aircraft carrier? And he says because everybody is
only concerned about their job, they can only focus on their job, and frankly that’s how
the aircraft carrier works. But at this aircraft carrier, I can’t think of a better example,
frankly, where — and I really do make everybody mad when I say this, like we’re all in this
together, like it seems to me. So I think that your department and the success that
we’ve had through grant writing is a great example of how we are all in this together,
and I just wanted to thank you.>>Ms. Malinda Bryan-Smith: Thank you. Well,
we have great faculty and staff that do a great job with the grants. So if it weren’t
for them, you know, we wouldn’t have anything to do. So we are very appreciative.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Thank you.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Any other discussion?
Any other questions? I would entertain a motion to approve item A-3.
>>So moved.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. All in favor signify by saying aye.
(Ayes).>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
We do have two Executive Sessions tonight. The first Executive Session —
>>Trustee Lee Cross: May I just say, Mr. Chair, in case anybody in the Navy sees that,
my brother said that to me. I may have misconstrued what he said.
(Laughter.)>>Chair Jerry Cook: Don’t want any missiles
coming in.>>Trustee Greg Musil: It’s already in the…
>>Chair Jerry Cook: I would entertain a motion for the purpose of discussing an individual
employee’s performance pursuant to the Kansas Open Meetings Act exception relating to non-elected
personnel, would like to invite Joe Sopcich and Mary Nero to join us for this Executive
Session. The session will start at 6:25 and will last for 60 minutes. Thank you. Motion
to –>>So moved.
>>Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Musil and Cross. And
we will start at 6:25. Thank you.>>Trustee Lee Cross: All those in favor?
Aye.>>Chair Jerry Cook: All in favor signify
by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries. Thank you.
(Executive Session.)>>Chair Jerry Cook: We are back in Open Session.
No action was taken from the Executive Session. We are going — I would like to entertain
a motion to extend the first Executive Session for another 15-minute period discussing an
individual employee’s performance pursuant to the Kansas Open Meetings Act exception
relating to non-elected personnel. We’d like to invite Joe Sopcich to join us for this
15-minute session, and it will begin at 6:27. I would like a motion.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: So moved.>>Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: All in favor signify by saying aye.
>>Trustee Lee Cross: Yes.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries.
So we’d like to clear the room and we will go another 15 minutes.
>>Trustee Greg Musil: No later than.>>Chair Jerry Cook: I said 7:27.
(Executive Session).>>Chair Jerry Cook: We are back in open session
out of Executive Session. No action was taken. But we do have an item of action to take at
this time. Trustee Lindstrom?>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Mr. Chairman,
I would move that the Board of Trustees approve the college president’s employment agreement
as presented.>>Trustee Greg Musil: Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We have a motion and a second. Any discussion? All in favor signify
by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Opposed? Motion carries. Thank you very much.
I would now like to entertain a motion to go into Executive Session for the purpose
of discussing matters exempt from the Kansas Open Meetings Act relating to privileged conversations
with legal counsel and the attorney-client relationship in consultation with the board’s
bargaining representation in employer-employee negotiations. This session will last 15 minutes.
We would like to invite Joe Sopcich, Mary Nero, Becky Centlivre, Colleen Chandler, Gurb
Singh, Jim Lane, Barbara Larson, Rachel Lierz, Randy Weber and Melody Rayl to join us in
this session. I would like a motion for such.>>Trustee Greg Musil: So moved.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Musil and seconded by?>>Trustee David Lindstrom: Second.
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Lindstrom. We will start this session at 7:40, in two minutes. So that
will give you a chance to — who is not supposed to be in the room to clear the room. We’ll
start at 7:40. (Executive Session).
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We are back in Open Session. No action was taken. I would like to entertain
a motion to go into Executive Session extending this session for discussing matters example
from the Kansas Open Meetings Act relating to privileged conversations with legal counsel
and the attorney-client relationship and consultation with the board’s bargaining representation
in the employer-employee negotiation. Session will last 15 minutes. We would like to invite
Joe Sopcich, Mary Nero, Becky Centlivre, Colleen Chandler, Gurb Singh, Jim Lane, Barbara Larson,
Rachel Lierz, Randy Weber and Melody Rayl to join us. Do I have a motion?
>>Trustee Greg Musil: So moved.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Second?
>>Trustee Paul Snider: Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Snider seconds. We’ll
start at 7:57, right now. (Executive Session).
>>Chair Jerry Cook: We are back in Open Session. No action was taken in Executive Session.
I would ask for a motion to adjourn the June board meeting.
>>So moved.>>Chair Jerry Cook: Second?
>>Second.>>Chair Jerry Cook: All in favor signify
by saying aye. (Ayes.)
>>Chair Jerry Cook: Meeting is adjourned. Thank you.